Thursday, July 31, 2014
Text Size

All Celebrity

Yaya Han talks involvement with SyFy's docu-series, Heroes of Cosplay

 

By Patric Germay

adsfdsfAfter Comic Con reaches the public ears, the inner geek and nerds in all of us get anxious to see what lies ahead in the film and television world. Cosplay is no different to this phenomenon. It promotes the creativity and dedication behind building the costumes and creating new designs for superhero heroes from the past. Earlier this week, I was fortunate to ask a few questions to Yaya Han, a legendary costume designer, and judge at many Cosplay conventions. She will be seen judging at different competitions on Syfy's original documentary series, Heroes of Cosplay.

MediaBlvd> Alright, so the excitement behind Cosplay lies behind the complete dedication found in the fans of the costumes obviously – with expectations always rising – how do you keep your designs unique but – while maintaining the people's interest?

Yaya Han> Well, thankfully there are thousands - hundreds of thousands of designs out there. There's always something that you can pull from or there's always something that can inspire you. Cosplay – first and foremost – is a very personal past time – it's something that sits very deeply personal to each Cosplayer, you know, some are newly into video games that they grew up playing or some are really into the movies that they grew up watching like Star Wars. One of our cast members, Victoria, she's an avid Star Wars fan and she will spend the majority of her, you know, money and effort on Star Wars costumes because that's what she loves.

afsdfdsfAnd so I don't think that Cosplayers choose projects that try to, you know, to try and gain popularity so to speak – at least to me and a lot of our cast I'm here with at Cosplay – we choose projects based on, you know, the characters we want to be next. And so the popularity of a character doesn't always tie into what we want to do. By – and the other great thing is because we make our costumes, you can do your own version of a character. So even if you are making a costume that has been done hundreds of times by other people and you can put your own spin on it. You can choose your own materials and your own execution of it. And that is the great thing about Cosplay because there are thousands of variations of the same character.

MediaBlvd> Right – definitely – and my last question for you was – the cast has travelled to several conventions around the world. What was your most prominent convention experience?

Yaya Han> For me, I actually loved travelling outside of the U.S. I definitely think that Cosplay is a global phenomenon and to me, people in other countries and to see how they're cultures enjoy Cosplay is very interesting to me. And it's also very great to share a bond with Cosplayers from other countries – even if you may not speak the same language – you have that bond instantly because you're dressed up; you're in the same, you know, costumes that you made yourself and its – it's really amazing. I personally have probably my most amazing experience at an event in London. It was called the Grand Cosplay Ball and it was an evening of celebrating Cosplay from around the world. So I was invited as a guest to perform in costume and to me Cosplayers from all over Europe and there were even some coming from Asia and so – just really amazing to see everybody in these elaborate outfits, you know, enjoying the music and dancing together and having a drink together and just sort of celebrating that everybody comes from different countries but we're all together in this, you know.

Heroes of Cosplay airs on August 13th at 10:30pm on Syfy channel. It will have six episodes where contestants will travel to different conventions and compete to have the most unique and creative costume designs.

 

--

Patric Germay is a student at Ferris State University studying Music Industry Management. In between his legendary ability to quote Seinfeld ad infinitum and his classy appreciation of Frasier, he pours his soul into the power of words, writing and performing his own brand of alternative hip-hop under the moniker, Kabare.  His aim is to deliver lyrical style with a potent message.  Check out some of his tunage.  Also, he wonders why they call it Ovaltine when both the mug and jar are round.  It's gold, Jerry.  Gold.